Negative Religious Coping and Burnout Among National Humanitarian Aid Workers Following Typhoon Haiyan

Disaster relief work can take a heavy psychological toll on humanitarian aid workers, and it is associated with anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and burnout. However, little research has explored how religion and spirituality may buffer against or exacerbate these outcomes. This study exam...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of psychology and christianity
Authors: Captari, Laura E. ; Hook, Joshua N. ; Mosher, David K. ; Boan, David ; Aten, Jamie D. ; Davis, Edward B. ; Davis, Don E. ; Van Tongeren, Daryl R.
Format: Print Article
Language:English
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Published: 2018
In: Journal of psychology and christianity
Year: 2018, Volume: 37, Issue: 1, Pages: 28-42
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Philippines / Typhoon / Humanitarian aid / Helper / Religion / Coping / Burn-out syndrome
RelBib Classification:AE Psychology of religion
AG Religious life; material religion
KBM Asia
ZD Psychology
Further subjects:B Natural Disasters
B SUPER Typhoon Haiyan, 2013
B Disaster relief
B Humanitarian assistance
B EMERGENCY management
Description
Summary:Disaster relief work can take a heavy psychological toll on humanitarian aid workers, and it is associated with anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and burnout. However, little research has explored how religion and spirituality may buffer against or exacerbate these outcomes. This study examined the roles of positive and negative religious coping in predicting burnout among religiously/spiritually oriented Filipino humanitarian aid workers (N = 61) who provided long-term disaster relief services following Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). Controlling for direct and indirect disaster exposure (e.g., witnessing experiences and personal contact with disaster victims), negative religious coping predicted higher levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Results suggest that negative religious coping is a risk factor for burnout among national humanitarian aid workers. Implications for humanitarian aid organizations and those in helping roles are discussed.
ISSN:0733-4273
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of psychology and christianity