Religion, Islam, and Compliance with COVID-19 Best Practices

While many have implemented best practices intended to help stem the spread of COVID-19, there are also a substantial number of citizens, both domestically and abroad, who have resisted these practices. We argue that public health authorities, as well as scientific researchers and funders, should he...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Authors: Dajani, Rana ; Coetsee, Marilie ; Al-Tabba, Amal ; Al-Hussaini, Maysa
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Science + Business Media B. V. 2022
In: Journal of religion and health
Year: 2022, Volume: 61, Issue: 5, Pages: 4155-4168
Further subjects:B Ethics
B Public Health
B Covid-19
B Islam
B Religion
B Scientists
B Low and middle income countries
B Secularism
Online Access: Presumably Free Access
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Summary:While many have implemented best practices intended to help stem the spread of COVID-19, there are also a substantial number of citizens, both domestically and abroad, who have resisted these practices. We argue that public health authorities, as well as scientific researchers and funders, should help address this resistance by putting greater effort into ascertaining how existing religious practices and beliefs align with COVID-19 guidelines. In particular, we contend that Euro-American scholars—who have often tended to implicitly favor secular and Christian worldviews—should put added focus on how Islamic commitments may (or may not) support COVID-19 best practices, including practices that extend beyond the domain of support for mental health.
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-022-01621-6