Religion and Public Conflict in the Post-COVID Era: The Case of Protestant Churches in South Korea

Governments have attempted to contain the COVID-19 outbreak with a variety of regulations, including social distancing, facemask mandates, or limits on gatherings. South Korea was concerned by the "supercluster" case of a sectarian religious organization in February 2020. Since then, some...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Religions
Authors: Lee, Saehwan ; Oh, Seil 1969-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Published: MDPI 2021
In: Religions
Year: 2021, Volume: 12, Issue: 10
Further subjects:B cluster infection
B Protestant Church
B Covid-19
B religious market
B Fundamentalism
B Religious Freedom
Online Access: Volltext (kostenfrei)
Volltext (kostenfrei)
Description
Summary:Governments have attempted to contain the COVID-19 outbreak with a variety of regulations, including social distancing, facemask mandates, or limits on gatherings. South Korea was concerned by the "supercluster" case of a sectarian religious organization in February 2020. Since then, some Protestant churches have periodically caused cluster infections showing antagonism against health authorities. First, we traced all 2020 cluster cases and identified their denominational characteristics. We then utilized the 2020 CISJD data and conducted a series of multivariate regressions to answer the research question, "What causes differences among denominations in attitudes toward public disease control and in-person service attendance?" Results indicated that Protestants affiliated with liberal churches were more likely to follow public disease control guidelines and less likely to attend in-person religious services during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared with individuals from other denominations. Protestants affiliated with moderate, conservative, and fundamentalist churches tended to share antagonism toward public disease control, while cherishing in-person community rituals. This research highlights social implications of public conflict in Korea, where many Protestant churches have emphasized the significance of traditional worship services, claiming the constitutional right of religious freedom, while the majority of citizens, religious and non-religious, disagree with such exclusive claims against public safety.
ISSN:2077-1444
Contains:Enthalten in: Religions
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.3390/rel12100851