Is Religious Intolerance Good for Your Health?: Reflections on Korea and covid-19

Abstract Legal responses to the covid -19 pandemic have varied widely. Korea represents an interesting case study, as it seemed particularly well prepared, having enacted legislation in the wake of the mers outbreak, in 2015, to tackle future pandemics. This obviated recourse to emergency powers leg...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of law, religion and state
Main Author: Burke, Ciarán
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Brill 2020
In: Journal of law, religion and state
Year: 2020, Volume: 8, Issue: 2/3, Pages: 201-227
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Korea / State / COVID-19 / Pandemic / Infection / Protection magic / New religion / Intolerance / Religious freedom
IxTheo Classification:AB Philosophy of religion; criticism of religion; atheism
AD Sociology of religion; religious policy
AZ New religious movements
KBM Asia
KDH Christian sects
XA Law
ZC Politics in general
Further subjects:B International Law
B Proportionality
B Covid-19
B non-discrimination
B Human Rights
B emergency powers
B Korea
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Summary:Abstract Legal responses to the covid -19 pandemic have varied widely. Korea represents an interesting case study, as it seemed particularly well prepared, having enacted legislation in the wake of the mers outbreak, in 2015, to tackle future pandemics. This obviated recourse to emergency powers legislation, and couched Korea’s response in normal legislation, which tends to raise fewer human rights concerns than may arise under emergency measures. Despite this, however, Korea’s response to covid -19 raises significant questions about its compliance with core human rights norms under the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights, including freedom of religion and non-discrimination. These arose with regard to the state’s treatmennt of members of the Shincheonji Church of Jesus ( scj ), a relatively small, occasionally controversial, religious group. The treatment of the scj by the Korean state raises questions about whether its legal approach to tackling covid -19 was fit for purpose.
ISSN:2212-4810
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of law, religion and state
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/22124810-2020012